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20121201
20121231
Search Results 0 to 6 of about 7 (some duplicates have been removed)
with louisiana to do that. there is a steady in oregon that looked at people on medicaid and not on medicaid, considered a gold standard study. it showed the care and well- being and the health outcomes for people receiving medicare coverage were far superior to those not having health care covered and were uninsured. there are lots of issues in louisiana that are challenging for anyone to tackle. the evidence around the country is that you can make medicaid work well for beneficiaries and improve health outcomes. the discretion around assigning the program and determining the delivery system, contracts with providers, those are positions that are state decisions. >> you mention native americans as a specific population. when we are switched to modified adjusted gross income, in medicaid when the they are exempt from class sharing entirely in the medicaid program. we disregard certain income available to them as members of a tribe. that gets changed under magi. they will become tax credit eligible rather than a medicaid eligible. >>" i do not think that is the case. i hope they will get a ch
and president of the progressive policy institute. we have bob packwood from oregon, the former chairman of the senate finance committee. we hope to get your thoughts. the other folks here have been part of the conversation. my only message to the new arrivals, please jump in whenever you see fit. we have about an hour to an hour and a half. it is amazing at how time flies by. so please jump in. i will direct the conversation as best i can. we're talking now about the other very small issue in this debate, and that is tax policy and how best to put the nation on a sustainable fiscal path and incorporate changes in tax policy to get there. the question of revenue, how much, where to get it, the options on the table, and we like all your thoughts, we need some ideas. both sides need this to bridge this gap because right now we appear to be at a stalemate. i will turn it over to john podesta to get your thoughts. knowing that john has to leave, and the center for american progress has come up with ideas, and, john, maybe you would like to weigh in on some of those and your thoughts on this
will be best for oregon, what are the things that are native to oklahoma and that will grow the best heat they have their and the lack of water. what will do best in vermont, virginia. let's encourage our natural environment because, one, it is a lot cheaper. and she was a penny pincher. [laughter] frugal is the nice word. but she wanted us to live up to the best that god gave us, and she believed that having those native plants on the highways would remind us of the beauty that god gave us. and it was a lot cheaper not to be planting roses out there or something that was not going to come up next year. so when you see those little signs about, forgive us for not mowing but we're waiting for the seeds to go in the ground, it is said the money. and it is wonderful. we now have a wonderful wildflower center that has been named after her. she finally led us to do it. she did not want it named after her. but the lady byrd wildflower center in austin. we're doing everything to raise money for it and we're goingand. to do a children's garden so we can start with the little children, teaching th
've seen examples time and time again, pearl river, tennessee, the new life church in oregon, the lady in texas, where people have stopped the killer either in mid may hem by having a gun of their own, either a gun that was in a parked car or a gun that was in their person. i'm not saying that's the solution for everything but declaring a gun-free zone doesn't mean that you have a gun-free violence. that brave principal who tried to stop him, i admired her courage but it wasn't going to stop matters. she just got killed. i'm not saying she could have stopped him but making sure everyone in that school was unarmed, obviously that didn't help here. host: so we should arm school officials? guest: well, the police chief of st. louis has said that we should put that on the table. i'm not saying we should arm police officials but let's at least say that just like pilots. you know, pilots can be armed. we had a long battle about that. should pilots be able to carry weapons on a plane that's pressurized where you could do all kinds of damage to the plane's fuselage? and we agree that pilots sh
the supermarket in tucson, arizona, to a movie theater in aurora, colorado, a shopping mall in oregon, an elementary school in newtown, connecticut, to the streets of brooklyn, new york, why have we been so reluctant in protecting them? why have we let them -- left them unprotected, vulnerable to gun violence, death, and the terror that such actions inflict. who will speak for the people whose lives were cut short, struck down, maimed and traumatized for life? when will we realize that these incidents are not inevitable that we have the ability to prevent gun violence and an obligation to do everything in our power to make gun violence a thing of the past. the answer to these questions will define this generation of members of congress, our answers will determine the future of our civil society. americans have the right to demand answers from this congress. we have the authority to keep the guns away from the streets of our cities and towns. in the 11th congressional district which i represent in new york city, the new york city police department reported 274 victims from 226 incident
Search Results 0 to 6 of about 7 (some duplicates have been removed)